Derailments Aren’t Always Easy To Fix!

It’s been a busy two weeks since my last post; I needed to focus my time organizing my club’s annual exhibition, which was another great success as we continue to build on the event year after year, and I’ve been doing some traveling.  This week’s post will be about a train from another country, not that I was there, but I found it interesting.

Every now and again we, as model railroaders, have trains fall off the track, and if you’re unlucky they can end up somewhere that’s hard to reach.  This also happens in the real railways but it takes considerably more effort to pick the trains up.  Normally when there’s a derailment, which can’t be corrected with a re-railer, the rail cranes are called out to do the heavy lifting.  If the train is too far from the tracks a road crane is usually called in.  But sometimes the accident happens where there simply are no roads.  This happened in Scotland on the 28th June 2012 when a CBRf freight train of twenty-four PCA tank wagons hauled by a Class 66, number 66734, hit a landslide on the line from Corrour to Tulloch, along the shore of Loch Treig.

Fortunately nobody was hurt, but the locomotive slid down the bank towards Loch Treig and came to a rest a good distance from the line. The job of sorting out the mess was given to QTS who removed the crashed PCA tank wagons and repaired the line in just 12 days without any cranes.  They captured the whole event on this time-lapse video.

But the locomotive, weighing 130 tonnes (286600 Pounds), was simply too big and heavy for even rail cranes to safely reach and the nearest road was 4 miles away.

So the locomotive was covered up to protect it from the Scottish weather until August 2013 when the job of removing it begain.  The locomotive was declared an insurance write-off and QTS again took on the challenging job of breaking the locomotive up and removing it piece by piece. It took 70 days and again QTS captured the whole event on a time-lapse video.

All in all, this was an amazing achievement and 85% of the parts from 66734 were reused on other locomotives, but sadly this locomotive is no more.

So next time we have a train fall off at the back of the layout just remember how hard it could have been!